Bench grinder setup Pt. 4

February 6, 2016 0 Comments

Two of the goals I set when designing when designing the tool rest where specifically related to adjust-ability. First and for most, I wanted to be able to adjust the rest quickly. spending 15 minutes to set a tool up so you can use it for 2 minutes is always a buzz kill. Secondly, I wanted to have as much adjustability as possible. After pondering it for a while, I came up with the slot nut idea. It gives me 1-5/8″ of front to back adjustment, and it can be adjusted one handed.

The following video shows machining the slot nuts. While they look simple they could be difficult to make if you don’t use the proper order of operations.

Reference:

Posted in: Machining, Videos
Part of the Project

Bench grinder setup Pt. 3

January 25, 2016 0 Comments

Now that I’ve completed both the wheel bushings, I can dig my teeth into the heart of this project, building better tool rests. I’ve never seen a bench/pedestal grinder that came with what i would consider a good tool rest.  To me a good tool rest is one that wraps around both sides of the wheel, and has 2 to 3 inches in-front of, and on both sides of the wheel. In my opinion a lage work surface makes it much easier to grind metalworking tools, specifically threading and form tools. With regards to woodworking, a large work surface makes it really easy to grind plane and chisel blades.

I’m going to purchase a Oneway Wolverine jig for grinding wood turning tools, so the rest i’m building needs to mount in a way that it won’t interfere with it. Thus, my rest will mount to the wheel guard like the stock Baldor rests do. The following video shows the machining of the first of 3 parts needed to make my rests, it also gives a brief overview of what my rests will look like and how they will work.

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Posted in: Machining, Videos
Part of the Project

Bench grinder setup Pt. 2

January 15, 2016 0 Comments

A CBN grinding wheel is a significant purchase, usually costing a significant portion of what the grinder it will be mounted to did, and in some cases even more. Additionally, it can’t be trued like a traditional aluminum oxide wheel, so care must be taken minimize wobble & run-out. In the following video, I show how I made a bushing to mount a D-way 180 grit CBN wheel to my grinder. Besides centering the wheel on the shaft, the bushing was also designed to act as a space that would accurately center the wheel inside the housing.

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Posted in: Machining, Videos
Part of the Project

Bench grinder setup Pt. 1

January 12, 2016 0 Comments

Shortly before Christmas I acquired a new tool for the shop, a Baldor 8100W 8″ slow speed grinder. For almost a decade, I’ve used a no-name 6″ grinder for all my tool sharpening needs. While it always got the job done, it was never a tool I enjoyed using, so the Baldor is going to be a substantial upgrade in more ways than one. In this first video of what will be short series, I discuss truing up the stock flange washers supplied by Baldor, and I show how I made a steel bushing for mounting an aftermarket aluminum oxide wheel.

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Posted in: Machining, Videos
Part of the Project

A Zebrawood ring box

January 5, 2016 0 Comments

Jillian asked me to make her a ring box a few weeks back, and I finally got around to it over the new year holiday. Aesthetically, its pretty simple, little more than a hollowed out cylinder with a dome lid made from Zebrawood. Executing the design I had in my mind turned out to be more difficult that I expected. Since this and end-grain piece, I couldn’t use my chuck in the expanding mode like I normally do. Thus this piece became my first forte into jam chucks.

The two jam chucks worked fine, but I was a little apprehensive at first, as mental images of the work launching across the shop ran through my head. By far, the biggest difficulty I had, was due to the scale of the work. My carbide turning tools have fairly thick tips, and while hollowing I ran into some issue with the heel rubbing the work, and thus preventing the cutting edge from engaging the work. To remedy this problem I had to raise the tool rest well above center. This gave the cutting edge the clearance it needed to work, but essentially turned it into a negative rake scrapper, and thus required me to take light cuts.

It was finished with two thin coats of de-waxed shellac, followed by a quick buffing with wax. It was quick and easy to apply, and resulted in a mild sheen that emphasized the unique grain structure of the wood. Jillian was very happy with the finished result, so I must have done something right.